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Phytophthora ramorum in Canada: Evidence for Migration Within North America and from Europe

N.J. Grunwald
Associate Professor in the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Oregon State University

Niklaus J. Grunwald is a Research Plant Pathologist with the Horticultural Crops Research Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, in Corvallis, Oregon. His principal research interests include the ecology, genetics and management of emerging and re-emerging Phytophthora diseases affecting ornamental and nursery crops with a special emphasis on the Sudden Oak Death and Ramorum blight pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of Phytopathology and editor of Plant Pathology. He is the recent recipient of the 2006 ARS Early Career scientist of the Year Award and recipient of the 2007 Syngenta Award from the American Phytopathological society. Nik received his Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California at Davis

Research Highlight

Minimum spanning networks for NA1 lineage multilocus genotypes from Canada and the United States

Minimum spanning networks for NA1 lineage multilocus genotypes from Canada and the United States

Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death on oak and ramorum blight on woody ornamentals, has been reported in ornamental nurseries on the West Coast of North America from British Columbia to California. Long-distance migration of P. ramorum has occurred via the nursery trade, and shipments of host plants are known to have crossed the U.S.â??Canadian border. We investigated the genotypic diversity of P. ramorum in Canadian nurseries and compared the Canadian population with U.S. and European nursery isolates for evidence of migration among populations. All three of the P. ramorum clonal lineages were found in Canada but, unexpectedly, the most common was the NA2 lineage. The NA1 clonal lineage, which has been the most common lineage in U.S. nurseries, was found relatively infrequently in Canada, and these isolates may have been the result of migration from the United States to Canada.

 

Read the full paper: Phytophthora ramorum in Canada:  Evidence for Migration Within North America and from Europe

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